Moving beyond the traditional office

A look at how leading companies are rethinking and rebranding their workplaces

The office isn’t what it used to be. And for a lot of workers, it’ll never be the same again. The pandemic disrupted the idea of a “traditional office” work environment, turning the attributes used to define a great workplace on its head. 

As a semblance of normality starts to return, employers have begun to reconsider the idea of office space. From flexible workplaces to offices with more social spaces, here’s a look into how leading companies are rethinking and rebranding their workplaces.

What their future of work looks like

Dropbox Studios, created for in-person teamwork and collaboration—optimizing flow and format of office space to support creativity and community-building with larger conference rooms, classrooms with flexible wall systems and movable furniture, and minimalist decor for a visually and physically clean space.

How this will reshape the employee experience

Moving away from typical office terminology to leave stigmas like cubicles, clocking in and out, micromanagement, and office politics in the past. Studios provide employees the solution to their expressed desire to collaborate and ideate with their teams.

What their future of work looks like

Hubs were created in central locations for team-based meetups to collaborate on quarterly strategic planning in open shared spaces.

How this will reshape the employee experience

Pre-pandemic, only 17% of office space was allocated for collaborative work. With employees expressing that independent, focused work is best done remotely, office space has shifted to provide collaboration in a team-based setting.

What their future of work looks like

FLEXWORK introduces new spaces to function differently than typical office space, with socially distanced shared spaces to collaborate and celebrate. Spaces equipped with signage for efficient traffic flow while remaining socially distant.

How this will reshape the employee experience

Opting for a flexible and hybrid workspace focusing on employee well-being can help combat the effects of stress and anxiety on the workplace and overall morale that have resulted in more than 12 billion days of lost productivity across the world each year.

What their future of work looks like

My Work Mode offers team members flexibility in their office location choice by designing seasonally-based temporary remote offices to embrace the Work from Anywhere experience.

How this will reshape the employee experience

Giving employees the ability to work from anywhere grants them the freedom to choose how they experience life by pursuing bigger life goals. This includes moving somewhere that may be affordable, closer to family, or a place they’ve dreamed of. By removing the confinement of location, employers can focus on an improved overall employee experience, driving productivity and job satisfaction.

What their future of work looks like

Community hubs centered around collaboration, equipped with breakout spaces, comfortable furniture, and removal of desks.

How this will reshape the employee experience

A people-first design focusing on employee experience and company culture will communicate the company’s dedication to the team by helping employees feel more respected, comfortable, and valued.

What their future of work looks like

Using technology to identify the flow of people in the office space, conference room reservations, and employee schedules to help create a collaborative, shared workspace while remaining socially distant.

How this will reshape the employee experience

Using digitization to operate more efficiently, safely, and simply by focusing on density, space usage, and safer operations can create a frictionless and collaborative workspace experience for employees.

What their future of work looks like

Implementing a program to allow employees to work fully remote or use the office in a shared but socially distanced manner. This includes a focus on employee mental and physical health, compliance, and monitoring congestion in workspaces.

How this will reshape the employee experience

Infosys recognized the importance of improving the employee experience by focusing on a program to prioritize employees’ mental and physical health. With 59% of workers across the globe stating that a hybrid work arrangement would improve their mental health and the physical wellbeing of 54%, the need to shift what makes a workplace functional and successful has become evident.

Takeaway

With these big contenders shifting the employee experience, the trickle-down effect is inevitable. Businesses need to adapt new mindsets and technology to support hybrid work or face the fallout of employee exits to more work-life-friendly companies.

We surveyed over 100 workplace leaders to see how they're tackling the challenges of hybrid work. Here is what we learned.

What their future of work looks like

Dropbox Studios, created for in-person teamwork and collaboration—optimizing flow and format of office space to support creativity and community-building with larger conference rooms, classrooms with flexible wall systems and movable furniture, and minimalist decor for a visually and physically clean space.

How this will reshape the employee experience

Moving away from typical office terminology to leave stigmas like cubicles, clocking in and out, micromanagement, and office politics in the past. Studios provide employees the solution to their expressed desire to collaborate and ideate with their teams.

What their future of work looks like

Hubs were created in central locations for team-based meetups to collaborate on quarterly strategic planning in open shared spaces.

How this will reshape the employee experience:

Pre-pandemic, only 17% of office space was allocated for collaborative work. With employees expressing that independent, focused work is best done remotely, office space has shifted to provide collaboration in a team-based setting.